UofA Mining and Geological Engineering slideshow 6 UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering slideshow 5 UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering slideshow 7 UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering slideshow 4 UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering slideshow 1 UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering slideshow 2 UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering UofA Mining and Geological Engineering slideshow 3

Red banner saying "Since 1888"

Safety from the Start: Allison Hagerman

Allison Hagerman at UA jacklag drilling competition. Photo by Patrick McArdle/UANewsAllison Hagerman holds her breath sometimes in blasting class when the newer students load their own holes, but she knows these University of Arizona students are well-trained and take safety seriously, because that is what they are being taught. Not to mention, they are certified in mine safety by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, or MSHA.  

"We learn safety here, and we take it with us," said Hagerman.

Read more in UANews.

Ruby Barickman: Mentorship in Mining

Barickman on assignment in Michigan helping to plan a small mine project.Ruby Barickman stood mesmerized watching a 29-ton drill bit, or reamer, boring an exhaust hole 14 feet in diameter and 550 feet deep, backwards, from underground to the surface at a Rio Tinto mine site in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.  

The drill, or raise borer, one of only a few in North America, was assembled underground but operated from above ground, and that means fewer miners underground.  

"I was at the bottom watching as it first started to spin around and drill upwards," said the 2012 University of Arizona mining engineering graduate. "It was a completely new process to me. Even a lot of the older people I was with had never seen that before."

Read more in UANews.

Bree McMaster: Changing Minds about Mining

MGE alumna Bree McMaster

Alumna Bree McMaster's family didn't know what to make of it when she told them she was switching her major from nursing to mining engineering. "They just didn’t understand. Not that you won’t get dirty, but technology has evolved the industry so far beyond that image," said the 2012 graduate who is doing short-range mine planning in Elko, Nev.

Read more in UANews.

Mather Wins 2013 Fletcher Scholarship

Congratulations go to MGE undergraduate Peter Mather, who received a 2013 J.H. Fletcher & Co. Scholarship.

The award is given annually to one or more undergraduate students pursuing a mining or minerals engineering degree, with a desire to use their skills to to improve safety and productivity in underground mining.

A Life of Adventure and Education: Rita Riggs

Rita Riggs in hard hat and safety vestRita Riggs dreams of one day working in a copper and gold mine in Mongolia, the central Asian country almost as vast as western Europe and known for its pastoral nomadic culture, harsh geography and even harsher climate.  

The only problem: Mongolia, which sits atop one of the world's largest mineral reserves, bans women from working in underground mines.  

Still, Riggs has her "boy" name picked out – Baxter. She is ready to cut her hair, dress up like a boy, and board a plane to one of the most sparsely populated countries on earth.

Read more in UANews.

Vicki Seppala: Opening a "World of Opportunity"

Vicki Seppala with co-workers at the Candelaria mine siteShe was working as a business manager at a technology startup and attending classes at a community college in Phoenix. Every day on her way to class, Vicki Seppala passed by a brochure pinned to the wall, and every day it caught her eye, until finally it demanded her attention.  

It was about the University of Arizona's mining and geological engineering program.  

Seppala didn't see herself advancing much further in her job, and with a young son to support, she decided it was time for a change.

Read more in UANews.

Barb Filas: Mining in a 'Different Time'

Barb FilasWhen Barb Filas got her start in the business, she was hand-drafting documents and using a mimeograph machine to crank out copies for permitting. There were precious few women in mining engineering and none in a mining leadership position.  

"It was certainly a different time," said Filas. "Back when I was in school, a woman in the industry was very much an anomaly."  

Filas was one of the first few women to graduate from the mining engineering program at the University of Arizona. She collected her diploma in 1978 and followed her grandfather and father into mining. In her 35-year climb from the Illinois coal mines to the boardroom of a global mining firm, she has seen more change than she ever imagined.

Read more in UANews.

Women Carving Out a Place in Surging Industry

Mining engineering students train at the UA San Xavier Mining Laboratory

For years, women have been carving out a place for themselves in an industry where their exclusion likely is as old as the profession itself – but where their inclusion today is critical to meeting a shortage of skilled workers.

The UA department of mining and geological engineering, one of only 14 U.S. schools offering mining engineering degrees and only a handful with its own student mine, is dedicated to helping fill that pipeline, and that includes ensuring female engineers continue to gain ground in a surging industry.

Read more in UANews.

Mills Wins Copper Club Scholarship

Jamie Mills, winner of a 2013-2014 Copper Club ScholarshipCongratulations to Jamie Mills, recipient of a 2013-2014 Copper Club Scholarship!

The Copper Club promotes the copper industry by honoring those who have forged its pathways and paving new roads for students working towards careers in the field.

Congratulations to WAAIME Scholarship Recipients

The department of mining and geological engineering would like to congratulate Andrew DeSantola, Ashlyn Hooten, Jesus Garcia, Sarah Beal and Taghi Sherizadeh for being awarded 2013-2014 scholarships from the Woman's Auxiliary to the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers.

Pages

University of Arizona College of Engineering